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As an open think tank we provide a platform for anyone with good ideas on how to improve transatlantic policy. We encourage students and professionals to develop and share their analyses, commentary, and policy advice on contemporary issues of the economy, international security, and globalization. This section is particularly dedicated to Bachelor, Master and PhD theses and research papers dealing with transatlantic issues and topics.

Picture: Please remember to upload a professional, high quality picture to your AC profile, if you have not done so yet. If you encounter a technical problem, you can also attach your picture as a separate JPEG in your submission email. The picture should be at least 300 x 300 pixels. Do not send the picture as part of a WORD document; make it a separate file in jpeg format.

Submit via E-mail: You can submit your piece via email to staff@atlantische-initiative.org. Mention in the subject line of the email the “Theses and Research Papers” section. Include a short summary of the thesis, argument and findings in an abstract of 200 words max. Share with us an email that we can publish so that interested people can get in touch with you. We will include a Disclaimer, according to which all the information and opinions are of the author(s) and AI is not responsible for that.

Reference style and length: Please try to keep the text as short as possible so that our readers can benefit from a straight-to-the-point read and send a full bibliography. The reference style is up to you, but try to be consistent.

Byline: Please remember to include an author byline at the end of your article (1-2 sentences about yourself). Below the byline, please include a pledge that the article is entirely your original work and that you have not plagiarized from someone else.

Timeline: We will confirm within 5-7 days that we have received your submission. The editorial team will then review your piece and contact you as soon as possible regarding the status of your submission. Please note that we give preference to articles on time-sensitive topics and to users who frequently comment on other articles.

Browse recent posts

Same-Same but different: The Evolving Qualitative Arms Race

During the Cold War, an ever-increasing quantity of nuclear warheads and delivery vehicles determined the strategic parameters of international security. In the 30 years since then, the global nuclear stockpiles have been reduced gradually. This process has, at least for the time being, come to an end with the New START treaty on deployed strategic nuclear weapons. It was signed by the US and Russia in April 2010. Despite its overall success, the prospects for further (nuclear) disarmament are bleak. Instead, we are witnessing an evolving arms race that will, however, differ significantly from the Cold War tradition. Two main issues drive this process.

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Water Security – Where Cooperation is Possible

Water is the basis of life. The access, possession and control of water therefore mean power, make it a potential source of conflict. But the hypothesis that as nations run of out of water they may go to war is one-dimensional and linear. It underestimates other factors including how nations operate, what motivates war and the actual cost of war.
Shared water resources i.e. the approximately 276 water bodies, lakes and rivers shared by some 148 countries around the world, are generally seen as issues of potential conflict. Empirical evidence reveals, however, there have been more instances of cooperation than conflict over shared water resources in the past decades. On occasion countries have used their shared water resources to forge ties often leading to cooperation in other spheres as well.

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Healing the WTO: Cure or Amputate the Appellate Body?

The World Trade Organization (WTO) currently faces the biggest crisis since its inception in 1995. Events that appear as bureaucratic chess games threaten to risk the business rules of major trading nations around the globe. On 11 December, the Appellate Body, the committee dealing with WTO members’ appeals became incapacitated after its membership dropped from three – the minimum to take decisions on cases – to only one remaining adjudicator. New appointments have been blocked by the United States since June 2017. This effectively shuts down the body, because the minimum requirement for any decision is three judges. In a recent move, the U.S. government has placed a veto on any funding for the Appellate Body’s secretariat in Geneva, meaning that it will have to stop operating at the beginning of 2020.

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